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How to avoid hair loss
Simple steps vegans can take to ensure against it
Veganessa
ID#: 7072
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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2:47:07 PM on 20-01-2005


I hear quite often that vegans experience more hair loss than non-vegans. Also, that it’s particularly noticeable when a person first makes the dietary change to become vegan. I can actually recall this happening to me when I initially became vegan (7 yrs ago). After reading the following article, I now understand why this hasn’t been an ongoing concern, as I have inadvertently been doing everything right to prevent it. I lifted the article from veganoutreach.org. The author explains the possible mechanisms causing hair loss in vegans, and how easy it is to avoid/correct it through diet and supplementation. I feel this is particularly important for new vegans to know, as hair loss is a common reason why many revert back to non-vegan diets.



From:  http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/hairloss



Hair Loss

by Jack Norris, RD

Reprinted from the March/April 2004 Issue of VegNews


Dear Jack,

I am a women who has been losing my hair at an increased rate lately. Can that be diet-related?


Hair loss among women is not an unusual problem. In one study, 34% of women from Japan, the USA, and the UK reported increased hair loss compared to 5 years earlier. The reasons for hair loss are complicated and can vary from person to person. Thus, it is important to see a doctor who can diagnose the specific problem.

In some cases, hair loss can be diet-related. Hair loss sometimes occurs in rapid weight loss. In one study, hair grew back within a few months after weight loss. In other cases, there are less obvious nutritional reasons for hair loss.

In researching this question, I found a comprehensive review article by hair loss expert, Dr. D. H. Rushton of the University of Portsmouth in the UK (Clinical and Experimental Dermatology 2002;27:396-404). A summary of the article is as follows.

Hair loss can be divided into two categories: Hair loss with skin shedding (also called "scaling") and hair loss without skin shedding. Hair loss with skin shedding is likely related to a skin disorder. In some cases, supplementation with the vitamin biotin (1 - 2 mg for 2 months) has helped. Essential fatty acids (omega 3s and/or omega 6s) might also help in hair loss caused by skin conditions.

There is a lack of objective data about hair loss without skin shedding. At one time, there was a widespread belief that zinc deficiency is a common cause. However, zinc supplementation has not been shown to improve hair loss, even when a deficiency is suspected. One area that seems clear is that iron deficiency (a low serum ferritin without anemia) is linked to hair loss in women. In one study, 72% of women with low iron stores (a serum ferritin less than 40 mcg/l) had reduced hair density.

The amino acid L-lysine plays a part in the absorption of iron and zinc. Among plant foods, L-lysine is only found in high amounts in legumes, and a vegan who doesn′t eat many legumes could find themselves falling short on lysine. In some women, iron supplementation does not lead to an increase in iron stores. But in one study, adding L-lysine (at 1.5 - 2 g/day for 6 months) to iron supplementation in such women did increase iron stores and decreased hair loss by one half.

Dr. Rushton noted the following odds and ends:

ï‚· In a multivitamin, if the level of zinc is equal to the level of iron, then iron uptake is significantly decreased. A ratio of 3 to 1, iron to zinc, is desirable to prevent competitive interference.

ï‚· Excessive vitamin E supplementation (for example, 600 IU per day for 1 month) can adversely affect hair growth. In patients with hair loss who show high levels of folic acid (also known as folate), excessive folic acid supplementation should probably be discontinued.

ï‚· Reducing the frequency of shampooing does not help preserve hair and can increase the fear of hair loss because a higher amount of hair will be lost all at once when it is washed.

Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 7083
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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10:46:34 PM on 20-01-2005
That′s strange!  In all my years as a vegan and with the time I have been involved with other vegans, I have never heard the subject mentioned before.
Veganessa
ID#: 7092
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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7:27:03 AM on 21-01-2005
That’s odd, I would’ve bet money that you’d hear the hair loss thing all the time. I’ve heard it from several vegans (female), and seen many posts about it on other vegan forums. I guess it must be an issue for Jack Norris from Veganoutreach.org to have written about it. Here’s what William Harris MD has said about hair loss in vegans:

http://www.vegsource.com/articles/harris_hair_loss.htm


If you google *vegan “hair loss” *  you will find a lot of info and many forum questions about it.
RunAroundQueen
ID#: 7996
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10:30:45 PM on 13-02-2005
Thats unreal... when I was about 7 or 8 I had alopecia due to lack of zinc. I wasn't a vegetarian then, but the doctors I had said that when I was around the age I am now it would most likely come back due to stress or defitiancies. Now since I've become a vegetarian, I feel like my hair is falling out again, so its very interesting to read these. I'll get it all checked out on Tuesday (blood test day).
margaret
ID#: 7999
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9:38:00 AM on 14-02-2005
Hair loss in vegans... could it not be just another fad theory doing the rounds? Speaking personally, I never experienced hair loss on becoming a vegan, then or now. When I have my hair cut, it always grows back so thick each time, the hairdresser has to chop into it with thinning scissors.
It would be a shame if potential vegans were put off changing to a vegan diet after reading these 'scare articles'. Why is veg*nism so often looked upon as some sort of disease which must be treated with all sorts of vitamins and minerals? It's my belief if all you do is take animal products out of your diet it's a poison you have eliminated and that alone has to be healthier for you. I watched a cooking show on television once, because the guest on the show was a vegetarian. The chef, Geoff Jantz (not sure how his name is spelt) had the cheek to say to the girl, "I hope you are eating the right foods, as a vegetarian you need to make sure you are getting the right vitamins" This implication that veg*nism is somehow unhealthy unless we take supplements, in part is perpetuated by 'health vegans' They confuse the issue a lot because they seem to be a little bit obsessive about health altogether and are always on the lookout for another guru to tell them what the latest food/vitamin in vogue is.  
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8004
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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11:22:04 AM on 14-02-2005
I agree Margaret.  I would love to lose some of my hair!!  I often have to get a trim every three weeks as it grows so fast and so bushy.  My hairdresser asks "what on earth are you using for fertiliser?"

And I feel the same way about supplements, except for B12, for the reasons that have been discussed before.   I think some of the "health" vegans, if told that pigs' trotters once a week would fix their thinning hair, ingrown toenails or headaches on Tuesdays, would go back to eating pigs.  But then, as I've said before - I'm a cynic. I just eat food without analysing it.
Veganessa
ID#: 8009
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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12:09:58 PM on 14-02-2005
There are healthy vegan diets and there are unhealthy vegan diets. Just because a vegan is conscious of their health does not mean that they are not primarily vegan due to a deep love of animals. I think it's wrong to say that vegans don't need to ensure their diets are properly balanced. Vegan diets can be iron and zinc deficient if they are devoid of the foods that provide these essential nutrients. That’s common sense. One of my girlfriends only ate processed vegan food, and then wondered why she failed to thrive as a vegan. Perhaps she listened to people that said it was unnecessary to eat “healthy” vegan food...
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8014
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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12:49:44 PM on 14-02-2005
Perhaps I didn't word that very well.  As I've said in a previous thread to a lot of young women who complain of being iron and zinc deficient - eat a balanced diet instead of some of these faddy diets that seem to pop up all the time - as we don't want to turn people off becoming vegan if it appears that you have to watch everything you eat.  Get a good variety of food.  Don't pull it all to bits and make it sound as though it's too hard unless you have a degree in dietetics.  Vegans who "don't eat this and don't eat that" turn possible converts away in my opinion.  

Of course we all want to stay healthy, especially if we're trying to convince others to stop eating, using and abusing animals, and we need to set a good example if possible, but I don't think we need to pore over a chart before each meal.  My mother's generation, did not go to dietitians, and there was even less chance of it in the generation before hers, and they produced some pretty long-lived specimens in their day.

I feel that some of the youngsters who are deficient, would be just as deficient on an omnivorous diet.  Eat a good variety of food, get enough exercise and you don't really have to put that much effort into it to stay healthy.  We have provided an eating plan for any potential and existing vegans who would like one.  It is a common sense approach and applies to almost any diet, except for the emphasis on B12.  If they choose to ignore this there is not really that much we can do.
Veganessa
ID#: 8016
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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4:03:27 PM on 14-02-2005
DH, please don’t feel that my post was specifically directed at you.

I’ve often heard it said that vegans don’t need to be concerned with their diets. That, somehow, magically, it should be a given that they provide us with all the necessary components. I feel that it’s not a good idea to refrain from speaking of vegan deficiencies. It’s a catch 22, if you don’t inform people they may end up being malnourished. If you do talk about it, some will think that “all” vegan diets are unhealthy.

You said that too much talk on this issue turns away possible converts. I'm of the opinion that if you don't discuss the possible downfalls then many will revert back to omni diets once they discover an illness or deficiency. That's a shame, because they had already been converted. I take the stance that it’s important to be clear about the nature of vegan deficiencies, and the ease with which they can be avoided. I agree, everyone, whether they’re vegan or not, can be susceptible to diet deficiencies if they don’t balance their nutrient intake. I also believe that, as a general rule, vegans have less nutrient imbalances. However, on this forum we are more concerned with vegan issues, aren’t we? I respect the opinions of the vegan Drs that I listed above, and believe that hair loss (although, relatively uncommon) in vegans is not a fallacy, but an easily avoided/treated illness.  

As for living long, both my grandmothers are still alive, and they’re over 80 yrs of age. Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean that they are healthy. They have had more operations than I have fingers and toes. You name it - gall bladders, bladders, stomach ulcers, uterine cancer, heart, arthritis etc. etc. The poor dears rattle when they walk because they take so many tablets. Whenever I call to say hi they tell me that old age is a curse, and how much they are suffering with all manner of aches and pains. I often wonder whether they’d have these problems if they were vegan. Both are insistent that I start eating meat again, as I will never make it to their ripe old age if I don’t. Who the hell wants to, if that’s how you end up? You can be long-lived and yet still be unhealthy. My partner’s grandfather lived to 94, drank whisky and smoked a pack a day. Suffered terribly with emphysema, and many other smoking related illnesses. To me it’s the quality, not the quantity that’s important.
Catherine Lockley
ID#: 8038
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12:11:49 AM on 15-02-2005
Unfortunately, it's not a fad diet thing or an evil rumour, but a deficiency in Zinc and Iron levels specifically. It's not necessarily a vegan thing; as Nessa said, more to do with an unblalnced diet of any description. DH and Margaret, please consider sending any excess hair my way! I've always had fine wispy hair that looks fine out but once tied back disappears! I know 'the grass is always greener' and all, but what I wouldn't give for thick waist-length tresses:-)
margaret
ID#: 8046
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10:51:25 AM on 15-02-2005
I'm also a cynic Darkhorse, perhaps we've lived too long and seen too much!
Veganessa, it's always interesting to read or hear about theories of health, whether it comes from a vegan or traditional doctor but that's mostly all it means to me, an interesting read, nothing more. My world weary brain tells me tomorrow another theory comes along to discount the original theory.
I've also become very aware that there is a big divide between health and ethical vegans. As Darkhorse said, those who are vegan for health reasons alone, have convictions that last only until the next theory comes along. Ethical vegans, I would think, don't pay a lot of attention to the aspect of health in a vegan diet. We do believe it's healthy but it's just the icing on the cake really, a sort of bonus for living ethically. If veganism was found to be unhealthy I would still be vegan, because my focus is not on health. If a veg*an reverted to eating meat you could say with certainty they were doing it for health reasons so they aren't really a loss to the cause. The potential veg*ans Darkhorse and myself were talking about, those who could be put off veg*anism feeling it's a hard discipline to follow with all the emphasis on vitamins etc, are those potential veg*ans who feel compassion for animals and need a little encouragement and reassurance that their health will not suffer in becoming veg*an. If they feel compassion in their heart  they will become veg*an in their own time anyway but I think we can make the transition more enjoyable if we don't bring up stuff like hair loss and vegan deficiencies. From my point of view it's not true anyway and I still maintain if you take meat out of your diet, even if you do nothing more, you will not suffer a loss in nutrition. The meat will have to be replaced with something else which will presumably be more fruit, vegetables and grain and that's it!
Just as a little point of interest my husband, who is really an ethical vegan (though not as ethical as me- he he) tells most people when they ask him why he is vegetarian that it's mainly for health reasons. That's because he is a man and not young and we live in the country...I do have sympathy for him, opting to say that. Perhaps there are a few 'health veg*ans' who, like my husband, use this explanation for an easy life.
Catherine, unfortunately there is no cure. You need 'thick hair genes'. My sister has very fine hair inherited from our 'poor hair' side of the family. She has given up hating me for it by now, I'm glad to say!
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8047
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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10:53:12 AM on 15-02-2005
I try to keep mine fairly short, Catherine, and it is very grey, so don't think that would be up your alley.  But I could have filled three mattresses with what my big yellow dog has lost this summer - is that any good to you?  Gorgeous, soft, golden hair?
Veganessa
ID#: 8050
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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12:38:00 PM on 15-02-2005
I’m one of those health conscious ethical vegans that don’t exist ;D

If I found out tomorrow that veganism was unhealthy, I would simply find a suitable way to supplement my diet. However, there are many that revert back to omni or vegetarian diets with great regret. Not because they really don’t care about animals, but because they care about themselves and their children just that little bit more, and think that it's their only alternative. Of course, we know how easy it is to fix deficienciy problems, but do they? That's really the issue here. Often they will opt to adding as little animal product that they can get away with i.e. dairy.

It was only recently, at the Squirrel’s Christmas dinner, that I spoke to a girl who was on her 2nd attempt at veganism. The first she considered unsuccessful due to a loss of hair within a very short time of making the conversion. Subsequently, she went back to a vegetarian diet. Interestingly, I also experienced this fabled response to the diet change. Thankfully, mine was short lived. Now, if it were just the two of us I would be willing to admit to a possible coincidence. When you actually take the time to research this issue it becomes immediately apparent that many go through similar reactions. I posted the above thread in the hope that she may read it, and find it helpful for her continued vegan success. Such a minor thing to be aware of, and act upon, that I felt it worthy of revealing.

It’s logical to assume that by removing the meat from our diets they would consist of more veggies. Unfortunately, when one does this they fail to acknowledge that many vegans eat diets that unnaturally favor those fake, highly processed products, such as; yogurts, burgers, soy schnitzels, ice creams, cheeses, margarines, sugar laden cereals etc. etc. Some vegans are ignorant enough to believe these items are actually healthy. It’s important to make them aware that these laboratory foodstuffs can potentially cause future medical illnesses. The friend I mentioned in a previous post had eaten a vegan diet that consisted primarily of breads and processed food. Very little vegetable matter at all. I know, I know, that doesn’t seem possible. What with all those divine fruits, nuts and tasty vegetables? Alas, she’s a busy girl, and prefers the quick foods that require little fuss. If only she had been educated earlier to the healthy fast foods available, she may still be a vegan today.

Even Dr Klaper, on his web site, speaks of the very real problem of what they term “failure to thrive vegans”. He is currently researching the underlying reasons for this problem. I’m glad that he has the honesty and integrity to acknowledge their existence, and attempt to find the cause. Rather than simply brushing it off as an unfounded rumor.  
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8051
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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1:19:08 PM on 15-02-2005
I shouldn't be trying to answer this in the two seconds I've got, but, I think you'll find those that live on all the processed foods you just mentioned, Veganessa, would have lived on them as meat eaters too - only they'd have been the meat and dairy versions.  I'll betcha quids they didn't eat only fruit, vegetables, nuts and a little bit of meat.  I am almost 100% certain that when people change, they try to stay with pretty much the style of diet they were used to.  Could be wrong but......
Veganessa
ID#: 8052
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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1:40:33 PM on 15-02-2005
But, that’s exactly what I’m talking about, DH. If they should continue to do that (eat very little vegetable matter),you must agree, they would almost certainly experience hair loss, and other signs of vitamin and mineral deficiency. Meat and dairy etc. provide 2nd hand nutrients (i.e. the cow eats the vegetables and grains) - these fake soy products don't. Unless, of course, they are supplemented. Hence, the need for education, and my original post. I think we’re finally getting somewhere here ;)
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8056
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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4:30:08 PM on 15-02-2005
Couldn't it be said then that their previous diet was the reason for their hair falling out rather than because they changed to a vegan diet, as, presumably, they had been on the old diet for a lot longer?

As I said earlier, with all my years working with vegans, I have never heard anyone complain of, or discuss, hair loss, and I would find it a little difficult to believe that their many years of a bad meat-eating diet would not cause a problem, but a short time on a bad vegan diet would.  Or was the meat in their previous lousy diet, the reason they were able to retain their hair?  If this were the case, we'd have all the consumers of fake meats, milks and cheeses flocking back to meat in droves.  Heaven forbid!

But also, I'm curious as to just what is generally accepted as "processed food"?  I think in the past you have said you like toast, vegemite and avocado for breakfast.  Bread is processed and you could probably say that yeast is too.  Sanitarium  Weet-Bix, although sugar free (or so I believe) is processed and, in fact, almost anything we consume unless it's raw and "as is", is processed.  Where does one draw the line on "processed" food?  To make a bean and veggie curry is to process it, or do we just call a halt at the food processed in a factory rather than in the home?  

I know that a raw food diet is becoming more popular, but I think to be realistic, the change from meat-eating to vegan is a huge leap for most people, without expecting them to eat just raw foods as well.  Some will, of course.  It probably depends on what is motivating them and how strong willed they are.
Veganessa
ID#: 8063
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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8:49:09 PM on 15-02-2005
DH there’s a BIG difference between having a tablespoon of vegemite and one slice of bread a day to the sort of food some people eat, really. I have at least 4 pieces of fruit, plus “real” fresh juice every day. I consume at least 2 C of vegetables daily. That’s actually being conservative. Not to mention eating a variety of beans, chickpeas, lentils and brown rice. I rarely (if ever) eat anything with added sugar. There’s absolutely no comparison with my diet to those high in the stuff listed above. Admittedly, I have extremely good willpower, and I happen to prefer these foods, which makes it very easy. I can see you rolling your eyes from here LOL, but you asked ;D

How could the previous omni or vegetarian diet be the reason? Considering the new vegan’s hair falls out a couple of months “after” the transition. To me, that’s really a rather transparent pretext, and poor excuse, sorry. I believe you when you say you've never heard of it before, although I find that amazing. Have you actually googled - vegan “hair loss”? Please do me the favour of doing so, you'd find that it's a genuine concern, and not something I have conjured up to give veganism a bad reputation.
Catherine Lockley
ID#: 8066
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10:24:53 PM on 15-02-2005
I googled it Nessa and then backed up my net research (which admittedly can be highly questionable) by asking my vegan doctor if it was al true or indeed 'unfounded rumour'. She asserts that it is not a common problem in new vegans but is certainly the case in a small percentage of cases,-usually because of a lack of understanding of adequate nutrition, specifically iron, zinc and fats. Of course, the issue can be easily addressed by adding flaxseed oil, nuts and seeds and if necessary, supplements (although she always recommends food sources for vitamin/mineral intake). She herself had encountered 3 or 4 cases in her entire career spanning some 30 years.
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8068
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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11:33:23 PM on 15-02-2005
No, Veganessa, I had never googled it because as I'd never heard of it, it never entered my head to go look to see if this ever happened.  I'm not doubting you, but maybe we have just met up with different types of people and the ones I happened to know, either did not have the problem or did not see the need to mention it.  

Catherine's doctor would seem to have the same sort of experience I had.  The fact that she had seen  3 or 4 cases in 30 years suggests that those people went to see their doctor because they had a problem.

I think the people who have a problem with their nutrition, would have had the same problems with their meat diet.  I find that generally speaking, vegans are far more careful about what they eat as they tend to make enquiries when they change over as it is all rather new to them.  I don't really know, but I should think that meat eaters would be fairly unconcerned about what they eat as they would just continue the way they had been brought up.

I've always eaten heaps of fruit - when I was a meat eater and now.  That's part of my problem probably - as fruit is full of sugar - and sugar is calories.  And I would think that everyone, no matter whether omnivore or vegan, would have at least 2 cups of vegetables each day.  Why would I roll my eyes?  What you eat in a day doesn't sound so very different from what I would have, except I have three slices of bread, with one difference - there is NO WAY I could wade through a tablespoon of Vegemite!! Oh, and I don't have fruit juices (I eat my fruit) but I live on strong black coffee - no sugar.

Several years ago when a very popular dietitian was just through her time, she asked if she could do an eating plan for me for practice.  She allowed 10 slices of bread per day, but only 2 small pieces of fruit, (plus other things of course) and when I followed her plan I did lose weight, but I found it too difficult, as I snacked all day on fruit, and was never ever able to have just half a mango as she suggested!!!

We have been accused of trying to turn young women into anorexics (if they only took one look at me, they'd know how stupid that remark is), but perhaps a lot of the younger ones may see veganism as a way of keeping slim and perhaps are cutting out certain, important groups in their diet, and therein lies the problem.  And I think Catherine could have hit the nail on the head when she said they could solve the problem with flaxseed oil, nuts and seeds - but then that is usually the very thing these kids are trying to avoid - the dreaded fats!!
RunAroundQueen
ID#: 8088
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9:21:25 PM on 16-02-2005
Ok, speaking as a young woman and a vegetarian, I know for a fact that a lot of people between the ages of 16-20 would NOT become a vegetarian even if it would help them lose weight-- I know this because when I told people about being a vegetarian, even the ones who are trying to lose weight said that they could NOT give up meat even if it would help. So as many young women out there who would become a vegan or vegetarian for those reasons, there are just as many if not more who wouldn't.

Personally- I didn't give 2 thoughts to my weight when I became a vegetarian. I am actually surprised to be losing weight (gradually) on my vegetarian diet, because I do eat basically the same things I did before (besides the meat and animal products), and the reason I am more conscious of what I eat is because I check if they contain gelatine or other animal products which I don't want to be eating.

Also, I feel like my hair has slowly started to fall out again... but as I said before I had this happen when I was younger, and the doctor said it would come back again this time in my life. It has to do with zinc deficiancy and stress... I bet that if you talk to the vegans or vegetarians whose hair is falling out, you will find that they under a lot of stress-- because this is another reason for hair loss.

Sorry if this sounds narky, but after reading all of the posts I kind of felt like I had to stick up for the young women who aren't doing this for weight loss, or miracle changes.
Catherine Lockley
ID#: 8090
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8:42:36 AM on 17-02-2005
Hey RAQ, I became a vegetarian at 15, vegan at 22 and never did it for reasons of weight. I saw a calf being slaughtered under a circular saw for 'dingo baiting' and that did it. I found that I gained weight initially because I was loading up on carbohydrates, once addressed, that problem took care of itself, but I also teach young women that do go vego for reasons of appearance (especially in the Goth community where pale skin is a plus). They generally know about the AR strand of it too, but I wonder sometimes at their motivations. Currently two lovely girls are competing to see who can look more like a corpse (in my opinion) in the shortst period of time. Let's hope the old Byron and Shelley methods of acquiring pale skin don't become popular again!
Julien
ID#: 8095
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10:29:16 AM on 17-02-2005
I can see an argument buliding here.in any event I'm with you DH on the fake highly proessed bandwagon,except for the the affects of my head injury my general health is perfect(Dr said my blood was worth bottling)Veganessa I eat these "highly processed foods" and it has'nt affected my health and if you where to check the panels you'd realise foods like yougurt.soy ice cream,weet bix is'nt overly processed and usually contain no artifical anything and are quite nutrious eg high in calcium,iron,B group vitimins etc.. Margret sometimes I just want to beat Geoff Janz to a pulp,he often makes these sorts of comments(the programe is cosy with meat and dairy australia.) try wathing Ian Hewitson instead sure his plugs for Bi lo and San Remo etc are annoying(every second shot features their produts though he often cooks vegie meals (sometimes vegan) and he never talks down this type of cooking for that he has more credibility then Mr Janz.
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8101
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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1:37:40 PM on 17-02-2005
Hi RunAroundQueen - you're right, of course -- there are certainly a LOT more young women who don't change to a vegan diet, than those who do, for reasons of weight control.  And there are those who change to a vegetarian diet, who actually put on a lot of weight, because they fill up on cheese to supposedly replace the meat.

And those who have changed to vegetarian to lower their cholesterol levels, and find that with their consumption of cheese and eggs (to replace the meat) their cholesterol has gone sky high.  Once they change to a vegan diet their cholesterol drops to an acceptable level very quickly.  Their weight may not, but their cholesterol does.

I am always a little amused and confused at all the different theories on drinking fruit juices.  To me that's a very quick and easy way to get heaps of sugar and calories and yet the proponents of juicing will tell you what a great way to lose weight and get lots of nutrients.  (You don't get the same nutrients EATING the fruit?)  But last night I saw a small part of A Current Affair where a dietitian was doing her darndest to convince mothers to quit giving their kids juices and get them drinking water.  Some, it seems, drink a litre of juice a day and don't want to eat other foods.  It also played havoc with their teeth.  It was good to have someone agree with me, even on such a small point.

Just re-reading the article in Veganessa's original post, I read it that some of the problems are CAUSED by supplementation - too much Vitamin E and  wrong ratios in multivitamins, but also from insufficient legumes in their diet.  But I also read the article as hair loss being from many and varied reasons and not necessarily from a change to veganism.  As Catherine's vegan Doctor has said - vitamins and minerals should come from food.  So I think it is generally agreed that we should all have a balanced diet - I just don't think it should be turned into a science.

Also, as you say, RunAroundQueen, I think stress plays a huge part in peoples' lives and in a wide variety of illnesses.  And genes have a huge impact too.  I envy those who are able to meditate or have good control of their emotions.  I am sure It would make life much easier and more enjoyable.
Catherine Lockley
ID#: 8109
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10:46:30 PM on 17-02-2005
On the juicing front, I once tried Harvey and Marilyn Diamond's 'Fit for Life' regime, and gained 8kg from all the calories I was ingesting with the juice! I'm sure their theory is quite sound, but the quantities didn't work for me at all (I was working an office job at the time and didn't need all that fuel). I'm with all of you that cite stress as a major contributor to hair loss (and many of our fatal diseases as well). I suspect we'll go a long way toward population control simply by living the lifestyle we're living now. Sperm counts falling, more women infertile or too busy to have children, dissolution of traditional marriage structures, impossible expense of health care, damaged environment etc. Unfortunately, the list goes on and on and on. The more I research, the more I come to the conclusion that religious faith was a saving grace of previous generations re: stress levels. New thread?
Dark Horse
Moderator

ID#: 8118
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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12:48:24 AM on 18-02-2005
New thread?  That could be a looooong one!!
This 53 message thread spans 3 pages : ( [1] 2 3 ) >>
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