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uses/properties of rice flour?
blue penguin
ID#: 94744
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5:45:59 PM on 26-07-2007
I've been coming across a number of recipes that use rice flour, and I know it is a good alternative for people who need a gluten-free diet. It also works better in batters for frying as it absorbs less oil than wheat flour.

However, I don't really know much about how it actually "works". ie. How does its properties when used for cooking compare to wheat flour used for similar recipes? Can you just do a straight substitution of wheat flour for rice flour, or are they better used in a more complementary manner? And so on. Basically, I just don't really understand how I can use it to best effect in my cooking at present, and that really bugs me! :-)

I am looking for info elsewhere also, but I figure you can't beat the feedback from people actually using it themselves already!
Kathy B
ID#: 94745
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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5:51:16 PM on 26-07-2007
Blue Penguin, I don't know if this info helps you or not, but I've been in a similar situation to you with rice flours,  chick pea flours, spelt flours etc., and every time I thought I'd 'cheat' and substitute for some other flour I had on hand, the recipe turned out to be a complete disaster for me!
I'm fairly new to vegan cooking but I'm getting the idea that when recipes specify a type of flour (or even a type of vinegar) they specify it for a reason. Have no idea how they do it but it really affects the recipes whenever I don't use what they say...sigh!
For my own sanity, I just went out and stocked up on the different flours and just use what they say..
Sorry if this is vague but I'm like you on this one. No clue what the difference is but just KNOW that there is one!
betamax
ID#: 94756
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7:40:37 PM on 26-07-2007
Substitutes:

For general baking

whole wheat flour (Replace no more than half of the all-purpose flour with this and add half again as much baking powder plus a bit more liquid to the recipe.  Compared to all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour makes baked goods denser and co*r in texture.  It provides more fiber but about the same nutrients as enriched all-purpose flour.) OR
self-rising flour (Omit salt and baking powder from recipe.  Don't use this in yeast breads or pie crusts.) OR
pastry flour (This doesn't work well in cookies.) OR
cake flour (Don't use this in bread. It also doesn't work well in cookies, quick breads, muffins, and biscuits--it makes them very crumbly. In a pinch, substitute one cup of all-purpose flour with one cup plus two tablespoons of cake flour.) OR
barley flour (This has a mild flavor and works especially well in pancakes, cookies, and quick breads.  Replace up to half of any wheat flour in a recipe with this.  Contains some gluten.) OR
buckwheat flour (This is especially good in pancakes.  It tends to make baked goods heavier and stronger tasting.  Replace up to half of the wheat flour in any recipe with this.  Contains some gluten.) OR
oat flour (This is especially good in quick breads and cookies.  It makes baked goods moister, chewier, and more crumbly.  Contains some gluten.) OR
brown rice flour (This is especially good for those with wheat allergies; replace up to 1/4 of any wheat flour with this.  Baked goods made with rice flour tend to be crumbly, so consider substituting a mixture of one part arrowroot or other thickener plus four parts rice flour.  Adding more eggs is another way to reduce crumbliness.  Since rice flour absorbs more moisture, you may need to add more liquid to recipe.) OR
corn flour (This is a good substitute for those with wheat allergies.) OR
millet flour (This has a more pronounced flavor than all-purpose flour, and it tends to make baked goods co* and dry.  Replace up to 1/5 of any wheat flour with this.) OR
potato flour (Replace up to 1/4 of any wheat flour in a recipe with this.  Substitute 5/8 cup potato flour for 1 cup all-purpose flour.) OR
soy flour (This is high in protein, but has a very strong flavor.  Replace up to 1/4 of any wheat flour with this, then increase the liquid in the recipe and reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees.) OR
quinoa flour (This is higher in fat than all-purpose flour, so it tends to make baked goods moister.  Replace up to 1/2 of the wheat flour in the recipe with this.) OR
non-waxy rice flour (This is good for those with wheat allergies.  Replace up to 1/4 of any wheat flour with this.  Baked goods made with rice flour tend to be crumbly, so consider substituting a mixture of one part arrowroot or other thickener plus four parts rice flour.  Adding more eggs is another way to reduce crumbliness.   Since rice flour absorbs more moisture than all-purpose flour, you may need to add more liquid to the recipe or substitute only 7/8 C rice flour for each cup of all-purpose flour.) OR
wheat germ (This makes for a more nutritious product.  Replace up to 1/3 of the flour with this.) OR
amaranth flour (This is higher in fat than all-purpose flour.) OR
spelt flour (This tends to make baked goods heavier, so consider increasing the baking powder so that the product rises more.   Spelt is tolerated by most people with wheat allergies, and it's great for making pasta and bread.) OR
kamut flour (This is tolerated by most people with wheat allergies, and it works well in pasta and bread recipes.  It works best if combined with other flours.) OR
ground Passover matzo (A traditional substitution for Jews during Passover.) OR
potato starch (Another good substitution for Jews during Passover.)


For yeast breads

bread flour (This makes for a larger loaf, but it's harder to knead.) OR
whole wheat flour (Replace up to half of the white flour in the recipe with this.  If the whole wheat flour is co*ly ground, substitute 1 1/8 cup whole wheat flour for 1 cup all-purpose flour.) OR
light rye flour (Replace up to 40% of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this and knead gently.  Try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.  Rye flour imparts an interesting, slightly sour flavor to breads.  Contains some gluten.) OR
medium rye flour (Replace up to one-third of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this and knead gently.  Try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.  Rye flour imparts an interesting, slightly sour flavor to breads.  Contains some gluten.) OR
dark rye flour (Replace up to one-fourth of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this and knead gently.  Try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.  Rye flour imparts an interesting, slightly sour flavor to breads.  Contains some gluten.) ) OR
triticale flour (Replace up to half of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this, knead gently, and let rise only once.) OR
barley flour (This has a mild flavor.  Replace up to 1/6 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.  Contains some gluten.) OR
brown rice flour (Replace up to 1/5 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this, and try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.  This is a good substitute for those with wheat allergies.) OR
buckwheat flour (This has a more pronounced flavor than wheat bread.  Replace up to 1/5 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.  Contains some gluten.) OR
corn flour (Replace up to 1/5 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this, and try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.) OR
millet flour (This has a more pronounced flavor than wheat flour, and tends to make breads co* and dry.  Replace up to 1/5 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.) OR
oat flour (Replace up to 1/4 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this, and try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.) OR
potato flour (Replace up to 1/6 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.  Substitute 5/8 cup potato flour for each cup of all-purpose flour.) OR
soy flour (This is high in protein, but has a very strong flavor.  Replace up to 1/8 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this, increase the liquid in recipe, and reduce oven temperature by 25 degrees.  Also consider increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.) OR
soya flour (Replace up to 1/5 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.) OR
quinoa flour (This is higher in fat, so it tends to make bread moister.  Replace up to 1/4 of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.) OR
non-waxy rice flour (Replace up to 1/5 of any wheat flour with this, and either increase the liquid in recipe or substitute 7/8 cup rice flour for each cup of all-purpose flour.  Also try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.) OR
wheat germ (This makes bread more nutritious.  Replace up to a third of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.) OR  
amaranth flour (This is higher in fat than wheat flour.  Replace up to a fourth of the wheat flour in a bread recipe with this.) OR
spelt flour (This tends to make bread heavier.  Try increasing the yeast so that the bread rises more.  Spelt flour is tolerated by most people with wheat allergies.) OR
kamut flour (This is tolerated by most people with wheat allergies.)
joanne
ID#: 94773
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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8:54:21 PM on 26-07-2007
rice flour is much finer than wheat flour and therefore is generally used in things that require a fine or crumbley texture. Rice flour is used in shortbread and things like short pastry and melting moments etc. ALL of which are vegan if you use nuttelex. A plateful of lovely vegan Melting Moments will make even the biggest skeptic reassess their ideas :)
wildtigercubs
ID#: 94775
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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9:09:29 PM on 26-07-2007
Yuuuuum. You don't have a recipe handy for some of those by any chance do you Joanne? (waits in hope)
ckimana
ID#: 94778
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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9:18:19 PM on 26-07-2007
mmmm...that does sound good joanne! I used to love melting moments but have yet to try a vegan version!!!
joanne
ID#: 94786
Vegetarian and Vegan Society of Queensland member
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9:35:56 PM on 26-07-2007
All you need is a 1960's cookbook. I have some great ones! Very retro indeed. They have all the recipes for all the old faves and in most cases converting is as simple as using nuttalex etc instead of butter or egg replacer. I have even made (once, musta got lucky) a perfect sponge cake following the recipe but using egg replacer.
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